Photography

Photos of a child (including your own child) also contravene Criminal Codes and censorship laws if the child is photographed in a provocative or sexual manner.

Where a sporting event is held on a club’s private property, privately owned land, a school or council owned facilities, the owner of private property or venue is able to restrict, ban or require permission of photography anywhere in their venue (e.g. some council owned facilities will not allow mobile phones or cameras in change rooms or toilets). Where a sporting event is held on private property not owned by the organisers, it is good practice to determine a mutually agreed photographing policy.

In Australia, generally speaking, there is no law restricting photography of people (including children) in public spaces as long as the images are not:

  • indecent (such as 'up skirt' or 'downblouse' photographs taken covertly in change rooms or toilets)
  • being used for voyeurism or made for the purpose of observing and visually recording a person’s genital or anal region
  • protected by a court order (eg. child custody or witness protection)
  • defamatory
  • being for commercial purposes (person’s likeness is used to endorse or entice people to buy a product).

If a person is taking photographs inappropriately (e.g. breaching the restrictions or ban in place for that private property or venue), then venue management can request the person to stop. If the person refuses, the police or security may be called to escort them off the property.

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